Tag Archives: Sacred Music

Adrian Willaert: Verbum bonum et suave

Today, we continue our perusal of the sacred polyphony with one of the greatest Catholic composers of the 16th Century, Adrian Willaert, the founder of the Venetian School of polyphony.

Adrian Willaert, born at Rumbeke, near Roeselare, in western Flanders (now modern Belgium) around 1490 A.D.. He went to Paris to study law, but ended up studying music with Jean Mouton, whose repertoire has already been featured here at FromRome.Info. After his studies, he persued a career in musical composition in Italy.

According to anecdote, when he arrived at Rome, he found that his composition, Verbum bonum et suave was being sung by the Sistine Choir every feast of Our Lady, as if it were a piece by Josquin des Pres. When he informed them it was his own, they never sang it again.

At 5 P.M., FromRome.Info brings you a selection of sacred music from Catholic composers throughout the ages, for your edification and to help us all realize how profoundly inimical the Aggiornamento has been to Catholic worship.

 

Jacob Obrecht: Missa Sub tuum praesidium

As we conclude our perusal of the sacred repertoire of Jacob Obrecht, we come to his Missa Sub tuum praesidium, which he wrote to honor the Most Blessed Virgin as Mediatrix of All Grace.

In this Mass, Obrecht has the soprano do the chant and the supporting voices, which following the Kyrie, increase in number for each part of the Mass, like Angels flocking to the Divine Worship.

At 5 P.M., FromRome.Info brings you a selection of sacred music from Catholic composers throughout the ages, for your edification and to help us all realize how profoundly inimical the Aggiornamento has been to Catholic worship.

 

Jacob Obrecht: Missa Maria Zart, Agnus Dei

Today, as we peruse the sacred repertoire of Obrecht, we feature the Tallis Scholar’s performance of the Angus Dei from Jacob’s Missa Maria Zart.

Every evening at 5. P. M., Rome time, FromRome.Info features a selection of sacred music from Catholic composers of fame in past ages, to edify our readers and help them understand how profoundly contrary to the right notion of the aesthetic the liturgical reforms of Vatican II are and have been.

Jacob Obrecht: Missa Maria Zart, Gloria

Today, as we peruse the sacred repertoire of Obrecht, we feature the Tallis Scholar’s performance of the Gloria from Jacob’s Missa Maria Zart.

Every evening at 5. P. M., Rome time, FromRome.Info features a selection of sacred music from Catholic composers of fame in past ages, to edify our readers and help them understand how profoundly contrary to the right notion of the aesthetic the liturgical reforms of Vatican II are and have been.

Jacob Obrecht: Missa Maria Zart, Christe

Today, as we peruse the sacred repertoire of Obrecht, we feature the Tallis Scholar’s performance of the second part of the Kyria, the Christe from Jacob’s Missa Maria Zart.

Every evening at 5. P. M., Rome time, FromRome.Info features a selection of sacred music from Catholic composers of fame in past ages, to edify our readers and help them understand how profoundly contrary to the right notion of the aesthetic the liturgical reforms of Vatican II are and have been.

Jacob Obrecht: Missa Maria Zart, Kyrie

Today, as we peruse the sacred repertoire of Obrecht, we feature the Tallis Scholar’s performance of the Kyrie from Jacob’s Missa Maria Zart.

An interesting fact about the invention of sacred polyphony in the 14th and 15th centuries, is that the centers of its production were in the rich mercantile cities of Flanders and neighboring towns and among the courts of the nobility in Northern Italy. The common desire to glorify God as part and parcel of the manifestation of the magnificent of their towns or families went hand in had. Decried by others in more barbarous times and nations, this is a true Catholic approach to God, family, city art and music, making an ally of all in the service of the Divine Majesty. — Another reason why those who hate God on principle, likewise hate Catholic culture.

Every evening at 5. P. M., Rome time, FromRome.Info features a selection of sacred music from Catholic composers of fame in past ages, to edify our readers and help them understand how profoundly contrary to the right notion of the aesthetic the liturgical reforms of Vatican II are and have been.

Jacob Obrecht: Missa Caput, Agnus Dei

Today, as we peruse the sacred repertoire of Obrecht, we feature the Orchard Enterprises performance of the Angus Dei from Jacob’s Missa Caput.

Jacob Obrecht (Hobrecht) was born in 1457, just four years after the fall of Constantinople to the Turks. His father was a trumpet player and it is presumed that he followed him in that profession. He was so poor that often he had to sell his copies of choir books to pay for his expenses. He became a priest and learned from choir masters the art of composition. It is for this reason that his compositions use the human voice much like a sonorous trumpet. He died of the Bubonic Plague while at Ferrara, in Italy, in 1505.

Every evening at 5. P. M., Rome time, FromRome.Info features a selection of sacred music from Catholic composers of fame in past ages, to edify our readers and help them understand how profoundly contrary to the right notion of the aesthetic the liturgical reforms of Vatican II are and have been.

Jacob Obrecht: Missa de Sancto Donatiano

Today, as we peruse the sacred repertoire of Obrecht, we feature the Tallis Scholars performance of his Missa de Santo Donatiano from Saint James’ Church, in Bruges, Belgium performed on May 10, 2018.

This is the kind of music which glorified the Catholic Religion in the generation immediately prior to the so called “Reformation”, which resulted in the second most violent and irrational attack on sacred art in Europe in its 3000 year history, next to the horrors committed by the Turks in the Balkans.

Every evening at 5. P. M., Rome time, FromRome.Info features a selection of sacred music from Catholic composers of fame in past ages, to edify our readers and help them understand how profoundly contrary to the right notion of the aesthetic the liturgical reforms of Vatican II are and have been.

Jacob Obrecht: Beata es, Maria

This week we feature Jacob Obrecht, a Catholic composer of polyphony in the latter 15th Century: a contemporary of Josquin des Pres and Jean Mouton, whose music we have already featured during out 5 PM daily Evening selection of Sacred Music from Catholic Composers through the ages.

Today’s piece is entitled, Beata es, Maria — Blessed art thou, Mary. It is a beautiful meditative rendition of the Archangel’s Salutation to the Virgin.

Obrecht was born at in Flanders, at Ghent in 1457 and died at Ferrara, Italy, in 1505, in the month of July. He was the most famous composers of music for the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass in his generation, being eclipsed solely by Josquin des Pres in his last years.

Jean Mouton: Quaeramus cum pastoribus

As we continue to peruse the sacred repertoire of Jean Mouton, we feature his Christmas Antiphon, Quaeramus cum pastoribus — We sought Him with the shepherds, performed by The Renaissance Singers in concert at St George’s Bloomsbury 15th December 2018.

FromRome.Info every day at 5 P.M. Rome time, features a selection of sacred music from the repertoire of Catholic composers throughout the ages, so our readers can better understand how foreign and inimical to Catholicism is the liturgical reforms enacted in the name and spirit of Vatican II.

Jean Mouton: Missa Alleluja

As we continue to peruse the sacred repertoire of Jean Mouton, the master of the Burgundian School who set Josquin des Prez on his career of magnificence, we feature today, Mouton’s Missa Alleluja, just in time before the Holy Season of Lent comes upon us. This beautiful performance was conducted by Merczel György at the Church of Saint Theresa of Avila Church, Budapest, Hungary.

FromRome.Info every day at 5 P.M. Rome time, features a selection of sacred music from the repertoire of Catholic composers throughout the ages, so our readers can better understand how foreign and inimical to Catholicism is the liturgical reforms enacted in the name and spirit of Vatican II.

Jean Mouton: Salva nos Domine!

As we continue our perusal of the sacred repertoire of Jean Mouton, we come to this splendid performance of the Antiphon, Salva nos Domine! — Save us , O Lord!.

The short Antiphon is beautifully sung by the Gentlemen of St. John’s College, Cambridge, England, under the directorship of Graham Walker.

FromRome.Info features every evening at 5 PM Rome Time a selection of sacred music to edify our readers in the incomparable riches of liturgical music in the Catholic Church throughout the ages. Hold fast to Tradition, it is the pillar of Christ’s Church on earth!