Tag Archives: Rome

Pope Benedict XVI departs at Noon from Munich, for Rome

by Br. Alexis Bugnolo

His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI returns to Rome at noon. He will depart from the Munich Airport, where before departure, he will be saluted by Markus Söder, the Bavarian head of State, known as the Minister President, an honor accorded to other heads of state.

The German press is being very coy about the announced schedule, as if they do not believe it.  In fact after relying upon the official press release of the Diocese of Regensburg, and being accused of fake news, because the Diocese changed its announcement just 18 hours later, the reticence of the German press is understandable.

No one is connecting the dots. While Vaticanista at Rome were of the opinion that Benedict XVI had been driven into exile — Nota Bene: Exile in Roman law is a punishment whereby one is imprisoned or put under house arrest in a distant land with guards, not allowed to go free — Pope Benedict XVI appears to have had greater freedom of action that many suspected, and had arranged the visit on his own, without getting Pope Francis’ approval.

At any rate the German Nuncio was not notified in advance. And after the Diocese announced that Pope Benedict had no definite planned date for a return, he rushed to Regensburg to extract an announcement of an immediate return.

Those with eyes to see, who want to see, can see what is going on. Pope Benedict XVI is being taken back to the Vatican as a prison, after having escaped.

There is just too much risk for Bergoglio’s house of lies, if Benedict walks free. He might talk to someone and explain that he never renounced the Petrine Munus! Indeed, he already began to give such signs.

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CREDITS: The Featured Image is an areal photograph of the Munich Airport, and is used here in accord with a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license, as described here.

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Ancient Bolsena Volcano gives ominous sign of Major Earthquake to come in Central Italy

by Br. Alexis Bugnolo

May 11, 2020 — 7:50 A. M.:  Yesterday evening the ancient Volcano of Bolsena gave off ominous signs that a major seismic event will soon strike central Italy.

The Volcano which appears on all maps today, as Lake Bolsenna, is approximately 100 KM north of Rome, on the norther borders of the region of Lazio with the regions of Umbria and Toscany. It’s massive crater is the largest in all of Europe, but is now filled with water and is a much desired tourist destination on account of its natural beauty.

According to MeteoWeb.Eu, 12 minor earthquakes struck last night on the northern rim of the crater, round about the town of San Lorenzo Nuovo, from 6:45 PM to 8:03 PM with magnitudes ranging from 0.8 to 2.5 on the Richter Scale.

The Bolsena Volcano is important because it is usually the harbinger of future seismic events in Central Italy, being the first to sound the alarm months, weeks or days in advance.

I was in Bagnoregio in the Summer of 2016, when a series of minor earthquakes occurred on the northern rim of the Bolsena Volcano. Though they caused little or  no damage, the people of Bagnoregio were terribly frightened. Not understanding why, I asked around, and everyone told me that when the Volcano of Bolsena becomes active in such a way as this, it is a sign of much worse earthquakes to come.

In 2016, the people of Bagnoregio were right to trust in this hand-me-down knowledge from their anceteros, because sure enough, weeks later, in mid August, a major earthquake struck central Italy destroying dozens of towns, some wiped off the map, and damaging buildings throughout the region of Umbria and Lazio and Abruzzo. The number of shocks went up to the thousands and continued for months, terrorizing Italians throughout central Italy.

The earthquakes of 2016 occurred, according to seismologists from the impact of the Tyrrhenian plate upon the Adriatic plate at the pressure point near Rieti. At the time the experts concluded the movement was so great that it would portend further earthquakes in Italy. Subsequently, they discovered that the Earthquakes had opened up a fissure in the ground beneath the city of Rome which could be physically measured running all the way from the Tyrrhenian Sea to the central mountains of Italy.

What was the meaning of it all? Italian seismologists had stated that Rome was spared in 2016, but that it would not escape, because the resulting pressures now in Central Italy were such that there would have to soon be an adjustment, that is, another major tectonic movement in the Rome area to compensate.

It remains to be seen, whether the minor shocks on the northern rim of the ancient Volcano of Bolsenna last night, simply forewarned about the 3.3 earthquake which struck north of Rome, this morning at 5:03 A M. local time (UTC +2), or whether they are an ominous sign of a soon to come major earthquake to hit Eternal Rome.

In the mystical visions of Saint Don Bosco he saw the City of Rome destroyed and thousands of dead everywhere. And he saw the Pope, who would restore the Church after the disastrous crisis of Vatican II, consoling the dead and afflicted.

Only God knows the times and places of such things, but it seems that they may be nearer than we have imagined.

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Powerful Earthquake Felt at Rome

by Br. Alexis Bugnolo

May 11, 2020. — At about 5 A. M., local time (UTC +2) a powerful Earthquake was felt at Rome Italy.

The Earthquake began with a violent lateral rumbling and ended with a snap, so so it felt. It lasted some 2 to 3 seconds. It could be compared to the tremors which occur as a fast passenger train passes by, to one standing within 10 feet of the track.

FromRome.Info will attempt to confirm this report, which was felt personally by the author, with seismological information as soon as possible.

UPDATE at 5:18 AM. —  The Earthquake has been reported by the National Seismological Institute of Italy (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia), as a 3.3 Magnitude quake, 5 KM southwest of Fonte Nuova, at at a depth in the Earth’s crust of 11 km. The location of the epicenter in reference to Rome, Italy is shown in this map:

Screenshot_2020-05-11 Terremoto 5 km SW Fonte Nuova (RM), Magnitudo ML 3 3, 11 May 2020 ore 05 03 22 (Fuso Orario Italia)

Shopping at Rome in a time of Pandemic Hype

by Br. Alexis Bugnolo

The pictures tell the story.

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In the photo above, you need no explanation if you live at Rome. If there is a line wrapping round the block, there must be a supermarket round the corner. This line was seen yesterday, Sunday morning, opposite the Piazza of Santa Maria Maggiore.

But look how many police there were to make it clear to everyone that they better not dare even to think to take a step towards the Basilica to visit it:

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The same sights can be seen elsewhere in Rome. Here are the lines at supermarket today, Monday:

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This supermarket has longer lines because it is one of the few which is managing to keep its shelves stocked. Indeed they have merchandise waiting on the curbside to go into the store. It’s a good way of publicizing that it’s worth your while to wait in line:

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As you approach the door, you are given plastic disposable gloves to wear while in the story. Something, someone though of in the past few days.

However, as you enter you are greeted with the daily propaganda. I notice propaganda readily, because I grew up in the USA where it is rarely seen:

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The Italian phrase, Andrà tutto bene, means, “Everything will be all right!”

I cannot fail to notice that future tense of the verb.

In the store, if you waited the 45 minutes in line, you found that bread shelf was nearly empty and the meat shelf was half empty. But everything else was well stocked, because prices at this particular supermarket are 20-50% higher than the others, whose shelves are even less well stocked.

As they say in Italy, you can only be certain of the truth, when it is publicly denied.

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It seems the Virus knows where it is going

Rome, March 6, 2020:  Reuters International is reporting that the first case of Corona Virus has been reported in the outpatient clinic at the Vatican. This would not be the first case in the city of Rome.

The case of Corona Virus was reported late Thursday, that is, yesterday.

With Bergoglio suffering already from this winter’s influenza, the presence of Corona Virus in the Vatican clinic caused panic. The entire facility was sterilized after positive confirmation of the infection present in one patient. Those with influenza are highly susceptible to succumbing from Corona Virus due to their reduced states of health.

So far in the Roman Region know as Lazio, there are 44 cases and one death. The victim was infected by a relative who visited from Northern Italy.

The Virus is highly contagious. Several hospital workers at Rome have tested positive. Source of contagion unknown, but presumed to be the waiting rooms of emergency entrances.

There are few cases in Europe. But many in China. The virus has not taken long to get to the Vatican.

It is almost as if it knows where it is going, or if an Angel of Divine Vengeance is pouring out a green vial of infection upon those against whom the Divine Wrath is kindled.

Let us pray for the innocents who are infected or who have succumbed.

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A Pilgrim’s Visit to the Arch-Basilica of the Most Holy Savior

popularly known as

Saint John Lateran

by Br. Alexis Bugnolo

Last Friday, I had the grace to make a pilgrimage to the Arch-Basilica of the Most Holy Savior, popularly known as Saint John Lateran, the Cathedral Church of the Diocese of Rome.

It is called an Arch-Basilica, because of all the Churches in the world it is the Chief and Head and Most important, being the very Cathedral of the Vicar of Jesus Christ. It is called a Basilica, from the Greek word for royal, because it was placed under the protection of the Roman Emperor, Constantine, during whose reign it was built. So important was this Church in the history of Christianity, that all the Churches in the world, named “Christ Church” bear a name which traces originally back to this structure.

The land on which the Basilica was built was originally a Fort of the Imperial Cavalry bodyguards, and then passed to the Laterani family. It came into the possession of the Roman Emperor Constantine through his marriage to Fausta, the daughter of Maxentius.

After his victory at the Milvian Bridge, Constantine donated it to Pope Militiades sometime before or during 313 A.D. At that time, there was a palace on the site, which had belonged to Fausta. It was converted into a Catholic Church.

The Basilica was consecrated in 324 by Pope Sylvester I, who made the adjacent palace his personal residence. Here the popes resided for centuries. It was here Saint Francis met Pope Innocent III and received verbal approval for his first Rule. Even, to this day, alongside the Basilica one finds the Curia, or Chancery, of the Diocese of Rome, as one can see in this photo to the right.

In the 10th Century, the Basilica was rededicated to Saint John the Baptist, by Pope Sergius III. Saint John was the archetype of all Christian holiness (cf. Luke 7:28) and especially of hermits and prophets. So a great number of Churches were dedicated to him throughout Christianity.

In the 12th Century, Pope Lucius II rededicated the Basilica to Saint John the Apostle, taking into account the growing understanding of the holiness of this Saint and protector of the Blessed Virgin. Today, the Arch-Basilica bears the full name: Arch-Basilica of the Most Holy Savior and of Saints John the Baptist and John the Evangelist at the Lateran.

The facade, or front, of the Arch-Basilica is an imposing structure. On Top, at the Center, there is a wonderful statue of Jesus Christ holding His Cross. On each side are statues of great Popes and Saints.

As you can see, the front of the Church has pillars which support a large upper balcony. This is called the Loggia of the Basilica. Both Saint Mary Major’s and St. Peter’s also have loggias. When a new Pope is elected, he normally greets the faithful from the Loggia of St. Peter’s and from the loggias of the other Basilicas during his first visits.

Basilicas according to Church law are directly subject to the Roman Pontiff, being considered as churches belonging to the Diocese of Rome. The symbol for a Basilica, therefore, is the Papal Umbrellino and Keys, as you can see in this bass-relief at the base of one of the pillars of the facade of the Arch-Basilica.

The wreath strewn below the keys is a traditional symbol of honor and dignity, being a depiction of a wreath made of laurel leaves as used by the ancient Romans for festive occasions.

The Lateran Palace, immediately adjacent to the Basilica was the residence of the Popes from 313 to 1309, or approximately the 1000 year reign spoken of by Saint John in the Apocalypse. A fire damaged the site in 1307 and 1361. Pope Clement V, who was a Frenchman, moved his official residence to Avignon in 1309, which began the long Avignese Capitvity, against which Saint Catherine of Sienna railed during her lifetime: the idea that the Bishop of Rome should be residing hundreds of miles away in France was a scandal to Christendom, and represented the extreme dissonance of the medieval notion of princely power, able to do what it liked, with that of the spiritual authority of the Pope.

The second fire so damaged the Basilica and residence, that when the Popes returned to Rome, they never again resided at the Lateran.

As you enter the Portico of the Facade of the Arch-Basilica, if you look to the left, you can see the Statue of Constantine, the founder of the Church, on account of his donation of the land. He is depicted in imperial style in a manner aping the pose of the first imperator, Augustus Octavian.

The Portico is decorated with elaborate marble flooring and beautiful friezes and imagery. The only ghastly ugliness is the Holy Door which is closed except for the Holy Years. It is made of case bronze by some wicked and demented artist, and was so ugly, I decided not to photograph it.

This reminds us, that Roman Basilicas are like history books, they record the events in the life or death of the Church down through the ages. The Arch-Basilica is no different, as it contains within numerous funerary monuments to Cardinals and Noblemen who greatly assisted the Church of Rome in their ages, and whose dying wish was to be buried or remembered in the Cathedral of the Eternal City.

As you can see, the Arch-Basilica is not as large as the Basilica of Saint Paul’s Outside the Walls, which I showed you two weeks ago, but it is stupendous in its own way. The floors are covered with inlaid marble of many colors, in the style popular in the late Middle Ages. The pillars on each side of the Nave each feature an enormous statue of one of the 12 Apostles, in imitation to the decorative style at the Vatican Basilica of Saint Peter’s.

The Ceiling is magnificently ornamented, as you can see in these two photos:

And, here:

The center piece, of course, is the High Altar, which appears to have escaped the desecrations of the Aggiornamento, for the most part (ironic, since after the Council the Bishops of Rome allowed the desecration of altars throughout the world, but protected that of their own Cathedral).

In the above photo, one is looking directly at the side altar of the Most Blessed Sacrament in the distant background. In the foreground, to the left, is the High Altar, which free stands at the head of the Nave of the Church.

In the photo above, a close up of the high altar of the Archbasilica. Medieval high altars often had canopies built over them, to prevent birds from leaving dirt upon the altar, if they happened to enter the Church when the doors were open.

In this photo, seen above, you can see the entire Canopy above the High Altar. Throughout the ages, various legends arose about why this canopy was so large. On my first visit to Rome in 2004, I was told by a guide that the relics of Saints John the Baptist and John the Apostle were kept above the altar, to protect them from the medieval devotion called, “relic theft”. In the middle ages, the Canons of this Basilica often claimed that the Ark of the Covenant was kept at the High Altar. This was not true, however.

Of all the funerary monuments in the Arch-Basilica, the most famous of them all is found to the left of the High Altar, on the back wall of the Church. It depicts Pope Leo XIII in all the vigor and triumph of his spirit.

Here is a close up of the statue of this great Pope.

This, without a doubt, is what a pope should look like and dress like.

Unlike Saint Paul’s Outside the Walls or Saint Peter’s Basilicae, this Arch-Basilica puts on display no great relic of any Saint. A pilgrim can obtain a plenary indulgence by visiting, and the mere opportunity to stand at the center of the Catholic Church, as one does, in this Church, is a worthy enough pilgrim’s goal.

May we all never forget and every foster a deep and profound sense of gratitude and reverence for the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church. And may we dedicate our lives, fame and fortunes to ever defend Her from all enemies, both outside and within, so long as we live.