Tag Archives: Bavaria

The Herculean Power struggle behind the Pope’s flight to Germany

by Br. Alexis Bugnolo

Just last month, Seewald revealed that Pope Benedict XVI had decided to address the world and put to rest any controversy over what he did in February 2013 by leaving for posterity — after his death — a spiritual testament.

This explosive admission was the cause of much speculation here at Rome. For it is known, that a pope has the power to name his successor, alter the laws for the election of a successor or make any sort of other profound changes, in such a document.

Where was the document being kept? With a close confident? At Rome?

Speculation swirled around 2 possibilities.

First, that the document is hidden in his office, at the Monastery of Mater Ecclesiae at the heart of the Vatican Gardens.

Second, that he had entrusted the document to his brother George Ratzinger.

Now that the Pope has at last be allowed to leave Rome on a trip, his offices are now free to be rifled and searched for the document. The Vatican in the last seven years has been caught falsifying many documents: from the translations of the Act of Declaratio of Feb. 11, 2013, which I exposed last year, to personal letters by the Roman Pontiff on diverse topics.  Can we really find any difficulty in supposing that the Vatican pushed Benedict out or allowed him to leave, so as to find this document and forge a copy which will praise Bergoglio profusely after the death of Pope Benedict?

Or did Benedict XVI go to Regensburg to recover the document from his brother?

Is the vice Commandant of the Vatican Police at Regensburg for the purposes of uncovering the existence of such a document and reporting its contents to the Vatican?

These are some of the deeper questions which must be raised about the Pope’s trip to Germany.

Other questions remain:

  1. Why does the Diocese of Regensburg say that Pope Benedict XVI’s visit is a private one, if he is not the pope?
  2. Did the pope travel on a Vatican passport or a German passport.  If on a Vatican passport, then as a member of the staff of the Secretary of State — unlikely — or as a head of state — meaning he is still the Pope.
  3. Why did the Republic of Italy fly him in a military aircraft to Germany? That is an honor accorded only to the Head of State of the Vatican.
  4. Why did Pope Benedict XVI have recourse to Gianni, the dismissed head of the Vatican Police — now working for Italian Secret Intelligence — to arrange his flight from Rome? Gianni was reprimanded by Bergoglio and forced to sign a statement declaring Bergoglio “Successor of Saint Peter”. The chose of Gianni indicates that Benedict turned to someone who recognizes that he, not Bergoglio, is still the pope, or at least, to someone not corrupted by Bergoglio.
  5. What will become of Pope Benedict XVI’s private library and papers?
  6. If the Holy Father should die outside of Italy, will he ever receive a Papal Funeral, or was he driven out to deny him this honor?

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Father Georg Ratzinger, Great uncle of Pope Benedict XVI

by Br. Alexis Bugnolo

Pope Benedict XVI comes from a family of priests. You may already know that his older brother, Georg, was ordained a priest on the same day as he was. But he also had a great uncle, on his father’s side, who was a priest: Father Georg Ratzinger. This is his story.

According to My Heritage, Father Georg Ratzinger was born on April 3, 1844, the 1811th anniversary of the Passion and Death of Our Lord Jesus Christ: an providential blessing which his great nephew Joseph Ratzinger would share, who was born and baptized on Holy Saturday, in the 1894th year of the Passion and Death of Our Blessed Lord.

The Ratzinger family originates in centuries past in the Southern Tyrol.

His parents were Johann Georg Ratzinger and Barbara Perlinger. He had one brother, Joseph, who is the great grandfather of Pope Benedict.

From 1855 to 1863 he studied at High School in Passau, on the Danube, in Bavaria. This was presumably a minor seminary. From 1863 to 1867 he studied theology at Munich, in what was apparently a major seminary. He was ordained a priest in 1867.  And awarded a Doctorate in Theology in 1868.

In 1869 he was appointed pastor of Berchtesgaden, a tiny village in the Southern Corner of Bavaria, on the Austrian border, which would 70 years later become the haunt of the infamous dictator, Adolf Hitler.

From 1870 to 1871 he was the editor of a journal, known as, “Fränkisches Volksblatt”, or the Frank Popular Newspaper, I believe.

In 1872 to 1874 he was chaplain at Landshut, in central Bavaria, and in 1874 to 1876 he returned to his work in journalism, as editor of the Volksfreund, or People’s Friend, at Munich.

In 1875 he ran for the Parliament of Bavaria, won and served until 1878. In 1877 he ran for a seat in the newly formed German Reichstag, and won, serving one term until 1888.

He served as pastor of Günzelhafen during these years, 1885–1888, while he held political office. In this he continued the ancient Catholic tradition of not excluding the clergy from temporal offices and imbuing in this manner the temporal order with Christian morality.

In 1893, he ran again for the Paliament or Landtag of Bavaria and won, and served until his death. In 1898 he ran again for a seat in the national legislature, the Reichstag and won, serving also until his death.

Wikipedia has a notable mention of Father Ratzinger’s literary achievements:

As a literary man Ratzinger deserves much credit for his scholarly work in political economy and in historical subjects. His chief works, distinguished by erudition, richness of thought, and animated exposition, are: “Geschichte der Armenpflege” (prize essay, Freiburg, 1868, 2nd revised ed., 1884); “Die Volkswirtschaft in ihren sittlichen Grundlagen. Ethnischsociale Studien über Cultur und Civilisation (Freiburg, 1881; 2nd. completely revised ed., 1895).

The later work maintains the ethical principles of Christianity as the only sure basis of political economy and opposes the materialistic system of what is called the “classical political economy” of Adam Smith.

“Forschungen zur bayerischen Geschichte” (Kempten, 1898) contains a large number of studies on early Bavarian history and on the history of civilization, based on a series of unconnected treatises, which had first appeared in the “Historisch-politische Blätter”. Of his smaller works the following should be mentioned: “Das Concil und die deustche Wissenschaft” (anonymously issued at Mainz, 1872) appeared first in the “Katholik”, 1872, I; “Die Erhaltung des Bauernstandes” (Freiburg, 1883).

These writings demonstrate that politically, he was much more a traditional Catholic than his great nephew.

He passed from this life on December 3, 1899, the last day of the liturgical calendar for that year, since the next day was the First Sunday of Advent.

Father Georg Ratzinger’s life thus was marked out as one lived under the shadow of Christ’s Redemption, awaiting His coming in glory.

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