Category Archives: Liturgy

Tomás Luis de Victoria: Holy Week

 

As we continue our perusal of the repertoire of the sacred polyphony of Tomás Luis de Victoria, the most famous composer of 16th Century Spain, we feature today his Complete Collection of Hymns for Holy Week.

FromRome.Info features at 5 P.M. daily, Rome time, a selection of sacred music for the edification of our readers, so that they can better grasp how contrary to the very nature of Catholic liturgy were the so called “reforms” of Vatican II.

 

Tomás Luis de Victoria: Missa Salve Regina

As we continue our perusal of the repertoire of the sacred polyphony of Tomás Luis de Victoria, the most famous composer of 16th Century Spain, we feature today his Missa Salve Regina, a Mass written in honor of Our Lady..

FromRome.Info features at 5 P.M. daily, Rome time, a selection of sacred music for the edification of our readers, so that they can better grasp how contrary to the very nature of Catholic liturgy were the so called “reforms” of Vatican II.

 

Tomás Luis de Victoria: Office of the Dead

As we continue our perusal of the repertoire of the sacred polyphony of Tomás Luis de Victoria, the most famous composer of 16th Century Spain, we feature today his Officium Defunctorum, that is, the Divine Office for the repose of the soul of one who has died.

The is performance is by Chorus Tomás Luis de Victoria (Granada) directed by Pablo García Miranda, along with the Zenobia Scholars directed by- Director Rupert Damerell, and was performed on Nov. 15, 2015, at the Monastery of San Jerónimo, Granada, and organized by Juventudes Musicales de Granada.

FromRome.Info features at 5 P.M. daily, Rome time, a selection of sacred music for the edification of our readers, so that they can better grasp how contrary to the very nature of Catholic liturgy were the so called “reforms” of Vatican II.

 

Tomás Luis de Victoria: Tenebrae

As we continue our perusal of the repertoire of the sacred polyphony of Tomás Luis de Victoria, the most famous composer of 16th Century Spain, we feature today his Responsiones for the Tenebrae, a which is celebrated on Holy Wednesday morning in the Ancient Roman Rite.

This performance is by the University of Texas Chamber Singers, James Morrow conducting, at the Mission of the Immaculate Conception, San Antonio, Texas, USA.

FromRome.Info features at 5 P.M. daily, Rome time, a selection of sacred music for the edification of our readers, so that they can better grasp how contrary to the very nature of Catholic liturgy were the so called “reforms” of Vatican II.

 

Tomás Luis de Victoria: O Domine Iesu Christe!

 

As we continue our perusal of the repertoire of the sacred polyphony of Tomás Luis de Victoria, the most famous composer of 16th Century Spain, we feature today his O Domine Iesu Christe, a Hymn for Palm Sunday and Good Friday.

FromRome.Info features at 5 P.M. daily, Rome time, a selection of sacred music for the edification of our readers, so that they can better grasp how contrary to the very nature of Catholic liturgy were the so called “reforms” of Vatican II.

 

Tomás Luis de Victoria: Salve Regina

As we continue our perusal of the repertoire of the sacred polyphony of Tomás Luis de Victoria, the most famous composer of 16th Century Spain, we feature today his Salve Regina, the Marian Hymn known in English as, the Hail Holy Queen.

FromRome.Info features at 5 P.M. daily, Rome time, a selection of sacred music for the edification of our readers, so that they can better grasp how contrary to the very nature of Catholic liturgy were the so called “reforms” of Vatican II.

 

Tomás Luis de Victoria: The Reproaches

As we continue our perusal of the repertoire of the sacred polyphony of Tomás Luis de Victoria, the most famous composer of 16th Century Spain, we feature today his The Reproaches, or Improperia, which are normally chanted on Good Friday as an expression of Christ lamenting His rejection by the Jewish people.

FromRome.Info features at 5 P.M. daily, Rome time, a selection of sacred music for the edification of our readers, so that they can better grasp how contrary to the very nature of Catholic liturgy were the so called “reforms” of Vatican II.

 

The High Priests have arrested Jesus

A MEDITATION FOR THE ANCIENT FEAST OF
THE SEVEN SORROWS OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY
ON THE FRIDAY BEFORE GOOD FRIDAY

by Br. Alexis Bugnolo

One of the most horrible aspects of the liturgical wreckage wrought in the name of Vatican II was the cancellation of the ancient feasts which had great power to move the hearts of the faithful in remembrance of Christ’s Most Holy Passion.

Today is such a feast day. It is the Feast of Our Lady of the Seven Sorrows. Placed today, on the Friday before Good Friday, it served to provide an opportunity for the faithful to share in the remembrance of what Our Lady suffered when She heard that the High Priests had ordered the arrest of Jesus and all the other sorrows which would follow from that, without neglecting the sorrows She had already endured in Her life long devotion to Her Divine Son.

And if you would like to read more about the power of Our Lady’s tears, I wrote an article about it in December, 2019: In Her tears, the Church can find salvation from apostasy.

But this year, I think most of us can understand personally in a much better way the greats anguish and suffering which struck at the Immaculate Heart of Mary when She heard that the High Priests had arrested Jesus.

That was the ultimate rejection of Her Son by the supreme institutionalized religious authorities of Her day. It was the perfect act of treachery by men whose religious duty was to uphold the Covenant of Moses, which forbade the arrest or accusation of a just man, and to await for the Messiah and receive Him.

By this act, Our Lady and the faithful disciples would be deprived of the preaching of Jesus and the presence of Jesus. He would longer be there to absolve them of their sins, to heal their sick, to be near their loved ones in death, He would no longer be there at their marriages, nor at their baptisms. He would no longer be there to lay his hands on the little ones, to confirm them in the Holy Spirit, nor upon men to ordain them priests.

And we today are in the same predicament as Our Lady of Sorrows.

Because by our Bishops we have been deprived of the preaching of Jesus in His priests. We have been deprived of the presence of Jesus in His Sacrament and through his priests. We have been deprived of the forgiveness of our sins by Jesus in His priests, we have been deprived of the last rights from Jesus in His priests. We have been deprived of Baptism by Jesus in His priests, we have been deprived of confirmation by Jesus in His priests. We have been deprived even of our priests, who now hunker away in hiding.

In the English language, this meditation is easier, since the word, “arrested”, means actually ‘to stop’.

Alas, though artists have excelled in depicting the sufferings of Jesus Christ in all their anatomical perfection, nevertheless, they still have not succeeded, in my opinion, in capturing the anguish which tore the Immaculate Heart of Mary asunder and disfigured Her Immaculate Visage with grief, when She heard these words:  The High Priests have arrested Jesus!

This year, we need to look at our own conditions and recall what Our Lady suffered: The High Priests have arrested Jesus. And where will we go to find Him?

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Tomás Luis de Victoria: Office for the Dead

As we continue our perusal of the repertoire of the sacred polyphony of Tomás Luis de Victoria, the most famous composer of 16th Century Spain, we feature today his Officium defunctorum, or Office for the Dead.  The office of the dead was the Divine Office recited on the days of funerals or commemorations of the deceased.

This performance is by the Tallis Scholars, with Peter Phillips, conducting, along with the Collegium Vocale of Gent, conducted by Philippe Herreweghe

FromRome.Info features at 5 P.M. daily, Rome time, a selection of sacred music for the edification of our readers, so that they can better grasp how contrary to the very nature of Catholic liturgy were the so called “reforms” of Vatican II.

 

Tomás Luis de Victoria: Ave Maria

Having lingered among the works of Palestrina, the most famous composer of sacred polyphony in Italy in the 16th century, we pass to Tomás Luis de Victoria, the most famous composer of the same, in 16th Century Spain. Today we feature is Ave maria.

This performance is by the Royal Choir of Catalunya, with Jordi Savall conducting.

FromRome.Info features at 5 P.M. daily, Rome time, a selection of sacred music for the edification of our readers, so that they can better grasp how contrary to the very nature of Catholic liturgy were the so called “reforms” of Vatican II.

 

Tomás Luis de Victoria: Office for Palm Sunday

Having lingered among the works of Palestrina, the most famous composer of sacred polyphony in Italy in the 16th century, we pass to Tomás Luis de Victoria, the most famous composer of the same, in 16th Century Spain. Today we feature is Office for Palm Sunday, which is a sublime celebration of Our Lord Jesus Christ’s Entry into Jerusalem. De Victoria composed this ornate piece, because in the time of the Council of Trent, the Catholic faithful had the habit of attending the Divine Office during Holy Week, which was celebrated with great reverence by a clergy who had great faith and great respect for things divine.

This performance is by the famous Monks of Santo Domingo de Silos (Espagne).

FromRome.Info features at 5 P.M. daily, Rome time, a selection of sacred music for the edification of our readers, so that they can better grasp how contrary to the very nature of Catholic liturgy were the so called “reforms” of Vatican II.

 

Palestrina: Ave Maria

As we continue our perusal of the sacred repertoire of  Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, the greatest Italian composer of the 16th century, we hear his Ave Maria caelorum.

FromRome.Info features at 5 P.M. daily, Rome time, a selection of sacred music for the edification of our readers, so that they can better grasp how contrary to the very nature of Catholic liturgy were the so called “reforms” of Vatican II.

 

Palestrina: Ave Regina caelorum

As we continue our perusal of the sacred repertoire of  Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, the greatest Italian composer of the 16th century, we hear his Ave Regina caelorum, the Marian Antiphon to be used in the Roman Missal from February 2 until Wednesday of Holy Week.

The performance is by Chanticleer.

FromRome.Info features at 5 P.M. daily, Rome time, a selection of sacred music for the edification of our readers, so that they can better grasp how contrary to the very nature of Catholic liturgy were the so called “reforms” of Vatican II.