3 thoughts on “Quiescence: A principle to understand world events”

  1. Voltaire, very much a part of the Masonic French Revolution, said:
    “If you want to know who controls you, look at whom you are not allowed to criticize.”
    In Medieval Christian allegory of the human heart, the lion for example represents the tendency toward Wrath; the peacock, Pride; the serpent, Envy; the snail, Quiescence, the sin of Sloth. Indeed, “the snails” of the world hide in their shells, are neither cold not hot; they are weak, sad, slow, make no sound; they serve as Satan’s footstool.
    St. Thomas Acquinas wrote that “The malice of Sloth is not merely cowardly neglect of duty, but sterility, a spiritual suicide.”
    Looks like we will have “to stick out our necks” for our holy Faith in the weeks and months ahead. Heaven or hell hang in the balance. Now, as in the early days of Christianity overshadowed by the Colosseum, it remains intrinsically evil to honor edicts based upon fraudulent authority and outright lies.

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  2. All of gods creatures are wonderful!
    Can human vices please be discussed without having to refer negatively to god’s creatures?!
    Anyone who has observed snails will know that they can often actually move super fast especially at night time and in wet conditions.
    >

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  3. Animal symbolism was most common in the Romanesque art of Christian Europe. The Gospel parables are full of animal references, good and bad. But the Book of Revelations was the source of most of the iconographic decoration of Europe’s cathedrals: for example the “tetramorph” of the lion, the ox, the eagle, and a winged man ( Sts. Mark, Luke, John, Matthew) typically next to the lamb, figure of Christ; the rooster (St.Peter); the dragon (Satan);

    The Book of Proverbs has plenty to say about human “sluggards.” St.Thomas Acquinas describes them as “manifestations of laziness (fear of effort & exertion), amazement and stupor (understanding becomes paralyzed and judgment suspended, placing one in a seemingly permanent coma).

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